Mr Bell’s Art Deco London In Pictures

London is a city that’s known for its architecture from the Gothic splendour of Westminster Abbey to the more formal Nash terraces of Regent’s Park, but until I started researching this post I hadn’t realised how many Art Deco buildings there were, the city is full of them. These are some of my personal favourites. Continue reading Mr Bell’s Art Deco London In Pictures

Mr Bell’s London: A Riverside Stroll From Hammersmith Bridge To Kew Bridge

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The Hammersmith name was first recorded in 1294 and most likely comes from the Saxon words for hammer and smithy, a trade the area used to be associated with many years ago. Continue reading Mr Bell’s London: A Riverside Stroll From Hammersmith Bridge To Kew Bridge

Mr Bell And The Ghosts Of Hampstead

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Ghostly highwaymen, a dead, interfering pub landlord and Bram Stoker’s Dracula are all chilling tales that form part of the history of Hampstead, a pretty little village perched on a hill in north London. There’s been a settlement here for over a thousand years, Londoners came here for the fresh air and to escape the filth and squalor of the city below. Continue reading Mr Bell And The Ghosts Of Hampstead

Mr Bell Discovers London’s Docklands

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St Katherine Docks was opened in 1828 and was one of the new style docks that were constructed in London after 1800. Continue reading Mr Bell Discovers London’s Docklands

Mr Bell Wanders The Strand, Embankment And Fleet Street

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Trafalgar Square is one of London’s biggest tourist traps but despite this it’s still worth having a look around and it’s from where my wandering starts. The original design for the square was drawn up by the great Regency architect John Nash. The site was the former home of the royal stables and although he cleared the area of the old buildings, he died before construction really began. The project was completed in 1845 by Sir Charles Barry, the architect of the Palace of Westminster, it was originally to have been called King William the Fourth’s Square. Continue reading Mr Bell Wanders The Strand, Embankment And Fleet Street

Mr Bell At The Inns of Court London Part 2: Grey’s Inn And Lincoln’s Inn

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The second part of my Inns of Court walk starts at the beginning of Chancery Lane. At number five there is a plaque marking the former location of the now closed Serjeant’s Inn. The Serjeant’s at Law were a superior rank of barrister, Judges used to be appointed from this small group until legal reform in the late 19th century made this rank of lawyer obsolete. The Inn at number five was sold in 1877. Continue reading Mr Bell At The Inns of Court London Part 2: Grey’s Inn And Lincoln’s Inn

Mr Bell At The Inns of Court London Part 1: Inner And Middle Temple

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In London there are four Inns of Court which together serve as the headquarters for the branch of the legal profession known as barristers. These wigged and black gowned advocates have had a virtual monopoly on the rights of audience in the English courts since medieval times, and anyone wishing to become a barrister at law must be affiliated to one of the Inns. The four Inns are Inner and Middle Temple, Lincoln’s Inn and Grey’s Inn. Once qualified the student is called to the “bar”, which was originally a railing that enclosed the judge in the courtroom.  Continue reading Mr Bell At The Inns of Court London Part 1: Inner And Middle Temple